THE #1 DOWNFALL OF NETWORK MARKETERS

June 13th, 2016

THE #1 DOWNFALL OF NETWORK MARKETERS

 

You may have logged on to this webcast just to find out what the #1 downfall of network marketers is to make sure you aren’t doing it yourself! Well we live in a fast paced, “I want it now” society. With online technology moving faster and faster and access to instant information our attention spans are getting shorter and shorter. So many promises of “Get Rich Quick” especially around this profession set up an expectation that if we don’t make money in 2-3 months, then we can’t do it or “it” doesn’t work. I fell victim to this and because of that I would switch companies every year or so for over 10 years.

The #1 downfall of most network marketers is a short attention span. We are excited and we can’t stand it. When the excitement wears off we can’t seem to get it back so we go on to something else. This doesn’t work in real life if you want a financially free lifestyle. People that achieve the dream don’t have a short attention span.

If we want a meal we pop it in the microwave or run out for fast-food. If our pizza isn’t delivered in 30 minutes or less, we are
upset. When we want cash, we just go to the ATM and in seconds we have it in our hands. Today when we request a ride with Uber we expect it to be there in 1-3 minutes. A 10 minute wait in unacceptable! And we expect that if we work today
we should get paid today! Compressing time frames is a important part of building a successful business today. I’ve heard that success in today’s marketplaces comes with collapsing inefficiencies. So speed is becoming a part of our expectation and this is the way we seem to be wired! Yet when you dig into the backgrounds of successful business owners, in most cases their success didn’t happen overnight. In most cases there are a whole bunch of things that happen below the surface before the we observe the meteoric rise to stardom! Think about all the research, investment, people, time, creativity and problem solving that goes on prior to a rocket ship launching. Billions of dollars are invested prior to a successful launch.

An Olympic athlete trains for YEARS prior to actual competition. Only one person goes home with the gold.

Years of research, planning and construction go into building a high rise or a freeway prior to it being able to offer any value in the marketplace.

A prospective attorney will school for 7 years and invest $150,000 before earning one penny. And then they will work 15 hours per day for $85,000 per year.

With a nominal investment of $500 or so it’s too easy to give up after 1 or 2 setbacks. I found out first hand that setbacks are no reason to throw in the towel when it comes to building a business. The strategy of throwing in the towel is not an effective business building strategy. Successful entrepreneurs are problem solvers and have a long term vision for their business. It’s the ONLY thing that works.

Because it is so easy to get into this business, it’s easy to get out as well. A $500 investment is easy to write off when things aren’t going so great. The founder of the company that has invested millions will go to the ends of the earth to be sure a company doesn’t fail. They have a lot to lose. In network marketing, it’s easy come easy go. Easy in . . . easy out! That’s the benefit and the drawback of this type of business. Even in network marketing, a long term strategy is essential.

This brings me to the topic of owner vs employee. I had a conversation with a successful diamond broker this weekend at a wedding we attended in Dana Point, California. We were talking about the difference between an “owner” and an “employee”. Some company owners get frustrated because it seems their employees just don’t care as much as they do. And some company founders have a goal to get the employees to think like owners. Why? Because owners will treat the business very differently than just employees. Most employees just do their jobs and then go home. When faced with a problem or challenge, it’s easy for an employee to think or even say, “That’s not my job!” But an owner will creatively come up with ways to not just preserve a customer but even grow the business and even solve complex problems.

Owners have a long term perspective and understand that a lot gets invested up front for returns that may come years down the road. Building a company requires a much different mindset! America West Airlines started as a result of the deregulation of the Airline industry. The monopolies dominated the industry with power and control. America West had one leased 737 and 200 employees most that were under 30 years old. Many were in their early 20’s. Our founder decided that he wanted to take on the big guys. It was a David and Goliath story that was emotionally charged. Our employees got behind the cause
and although we were all making less than $20,000 a year we felt the ownership of the mission. As a result, we would work 12-14 hours a day. We worked to solve ownership problems and came up with creative ways to keep expenses down and grow the airline as a cohesive team. It was fun, challenging and extremely rewarding. We grew to over 15,000 employees and 100 jets in 6 short years! Apple computers did the same thing when it took on Microsoft. They were the underdog and built a company for the individual. To this day, their employees feel like owners.

If you can imagine planting 20 Oak Trees by digging a hole and placing an acorn in each hole . . . not much shade in the first year or two! But you want shade! And if you become impatient expecting shade too soon, you may kill the baby plants! Imagine getting paid $1000 a month once the trees are five feet tall. And then getting paid $5000 a month once the trees reach
50 feet. AT 100 Feet you are making $10,000 a month. At 250 feet when the trees have their own acorns that fall to sprout new trees from the parent trees you are making $20,000 a month. And when the new trees grow to eventually reach 250 feet at maturity THEY begin to drop acorns you are now making $100,000 a month. Do you have the patience for your plants to grow into mature trees and then eventually spawn new plants. An Oak Tree with take years to mature but will then produce shade and acorns for many many more years after that.

The #1 downfall of network marketers is a short attention span. The average business builder does one of two things. They either build for a short time and have a setback and quit (50%) or they build for a short time, have a setback and take a 2 week to 2 month break and then get re-energized only to do it all over again (30%). 80% plus of our distributors don’t stand a chance because of a short attention span. We can change that by first making everyone aware that this is a problem.

Here are 3 things to prevent or fix the problem of a short attention span.

1. REALIZE THAT YOU ARE A COMPANY OWNER – This is your business and as a business owner you must have a long term perspective and run your business as a long term enterprise vs something you are just trying. A company owner that is building something substantial would not be dabbling in the business. When faced with challenges they don’t think about quitting. They instead think about all the ways to solve the problem and get past it. Sometimes that requires a radical change in thinking or environment. There are solutions to every problem. Your job is to find them. Learn the lessons.

2. STAY CLOSE TO THE FIRE – Stay connected to those people that are on a mission to change the world with your program.
There are people in the company that would never consider quitting. Be around those people on a regular basis. This is one big reason to attend the regional and national events. Dropping off that scene can be business suicide.

3. LET IT GO – To survive the long-haul you must learn to let go of the things you can not control and regain your excitement
each day. Hitting the “refresh” button on your business is essential to long term success. This is a learned and conscious skill.
Reinvent yourself daily.

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